Thread

March 15, 2010

by Nao

ito, shi

Ito is a thread that is used in sewing. While looking at words and phrases with this word, I was thinking that ito used to be a common word but it’s not any more. Come to think of it, we rarely use the material ito on a daily basis. I sew to fix part of clothing but hardly do it. Sewing has become a hobby.

We still use two interesting expressions including this character. The word itoguchi is a clue. The phrase “itome wo tsukenai” means “not to set a limit to the amount of money you invest.” In other words, you spend money generously. I think itome is not a familiar word to most Japanese people. It means a string attached to a kite to control its height. Tsukenai means “not to attach.” The particle wo indicates that the word coming before it is the object of the verb.

thread with the stroke order

  1. Draw the sweeping stroke from the top, change the direction of the brush, and draw the short stroke.
  2. Draw the stroke paralleling the first part of the previous stroke, change the direction of the brush, and draw the sweeping stroke that is almost horizontal
  3. Draw the dot at the end of the previous stroke.
  4. Draw the vertical stroke with an upward turn.
  5. Draw the sweeping stroke to the left.
  6. Draw the dot to the right.

Morning

March 14, 2010

by Nao

asa, chō

This character means morning. The noun “asa” means morning. When we read chō, it is always combined with other characters.

Kesa consists of now and this character. Since this is a special reading, we cannot separate the letters according to the sounds. That’s why I didn’t make a link to the sound “ke.” In other words, we never read the former character (now) “ke,” or the latter “sa.

Tomorrow morning is myōchō. In this case, each character corresponds to each sound: “myō” or “chō.” Myōchō sounds rather formal. More casually, we say, “asu no asa” or “ashita no asa.” The particle “no” is in hiragana.

morning with the stroke order

  1. Draw the horizontal stroke in the upper left corner.
  2. Draw the sweeping stroke crossing the previous stroke.
  3. Draw the left side of the rectangle.
  4. Draw the upper and right sides of the rectangle.
  5. Draw the horizontal stroke in the rectangle.
  6. Draw the lower side of the rectangle.
  7. Draw the horizontal stroke below the rectangle.
  8. Draw the vertical stroke crossing the previous stroke.
  9. Draw the sweeping stroke from the top.
  10. Draw the hook with an upward turn.
  11. Draw the horizontal stroke below the first part of the hook.
  12. Draw the horizontal stroke below the previous stroke.

To Make Use Of

March 13, 2010

We moved this to ->

 

http://www.japanesecalligrapher.com/bjc/2010/03/to-make-use-of/

Thanks.

Sweet or Spoiling

March 12, 2010

by Nao

ama-i, ama-eru, ama-yakasu, kan

The adjective “amai” means sweet and today’s character expresses a sweet taste.

Yesterday, we talk about “mi,” a character meaning taste. Let’s combine them together. Amami means sweetness. With the same characters in the same order, kanmi means sweets or desserts. Adding “ryō” after this, kanjmiryō means sweetening or sweetener.

When this is used in verbs, it does not mean sweetening but generally spoiling. Amayakasu means spoiling a person such as a child. As a result of this, one might tend to depend on others. We say, “hito ni amaeru.” Here, hito means others.

Last week, I wrote that ku gen is criticism offered by your supporter or adviser. The opposite of kugen is kangen, which means flattering words spoiling you.

sweet with the stroke order

  1. Draw the longest horizontal line.
  2. Draw the vertical line to the left.
  3. Draw the vertical line to the right.
  4. Draw the horizontal stroke in the middle.
  5. Draw the horizontal stroke at the bottom.

Taste

March 11, 2010

by Nao

aji, aji-wau, mi, mai

Aji is a taste of some food or drink. The verb aji-wau means “to taste.” Having a taste of particular way of activity or having a brief experience of it is “aji wo shimeru.” Shimeru means “to get.”

Aji also means appeal, charm, or attractiveness. You can say “aji ga aru,” meaning “tasteful” or “there is a taste.” A tasteful writing style is “aji no aru kakikata” On the contrary, ajikenai means tasteless or too boring to enjoy. Nai always negates the previous word.

mi is flavor or relish. Atoaji is aftertaste.

Draw the left hand side first.

taste with the stroke order

  1. Draw the left side of the rectangle.
  2. Draw the upper and right sides of the rectangle.
  3. Draw the lower side of the rectangle.
  4. Begin to draw the right hand side. Draw the upper horizontal line, which should be shorter than the other.
  5. Draw the longer horizontal line.
  6. Draw the vertical line.
  7. Draw the sweeping stroke from where the previous strokes intersect.
  8. Draw the other sweeping stroke from the same place.

* We added a special page to show you numbers, months, and the days of the week. Please visit here -> http://wp.me/PAlaB-1i3

Group

March 10, 2010

by Nao

dan

For most kanji, that is, Japanese characters, there are two types of readings: on’yomi and kun’yomi. The former, on’yomi, came from Chinese readings and often sounds similar to them. This type of reading hardly means anything to us when we hear only the sound. The latter, kun’yomi, expresses Japanese native words, which were matched to Chinese characters based on the meanings.

Today’s character has only one type of reading: on’yomi. So we don’t understand what dan means unless it is combined with other characters. To mean a group, we use the word dantai in kanji or gurūpu in katakana, for example. In an official sport competition, dantai means a team. More casually, we call it chīmu and write it in katakana.

Groups of musicians are expressed with this character. An orchestra or a band is gakudan in kanji. In katakana, each has a different word. An orchestra is ōkesutora while a band is bando. Here are more specific groups of musicians.

  • Kōkyō gakudan … a symphony orchestra
  • Kangen gakudan … a string orchestra
  • Suisō gakudan … a brass band

Other groups relating to music are kagekidan, an opera company, and gasshōdan, a chorus.

Group with the stroke order

  1. Draw the vertical stroke on the left.
  2. Draw the upper and the right sides of the rectangle.
  3. Before finishing the rectangle, draw the strokes inside. Draw the horizontal stroke.
  4. Draw the vertical stroke with an upward turn.
  5. Draw the dot.
  6. Draw the lower side of the rectangle.

Dream

March 9, 2010

by Nao

yume, mu

Yume is what you see while you are sleeping. Here is the list of some kinds of dreams you see while sleeping.

  • Yo chi mu … a dream that predicts the future
  • Masayume … When you see this dream, what you see in the dream happens in reality.
  • Sakayume … When you see this dream, everything opposite happens in reality. Saka means opposite.

Haku chūmu is a daydream or an imaginary events you think while you are awake. Likewise, yume means fancies or illusions, too.  It’s transient.

In addition to, yume also means a situation you would like to happen or realize as the English ‘dream’ means. If you want to mean, “I will make my dream come true,” you can say, “kitto yume wo kanaeru.” If you want to mean that you wish your dream will come true, you can say, “yume ga kanaimasuyōni.”

Dream with the stroke order

  1. Draw the dot from the top left.
  2. Draw the horizontal line crossing the first dot.
  3. Draw the sweeping dot from the top right.
  4. Draw the left side of the rectangle.
  5. Begin to draw a rectangle. Draw the upper and right sides of the rectangle.
  6. Draw the vertical stroke in the rectangle.
  7. Draw the sweeping stroke in the rectangle.
  8. Draw the lower side of the rectangle.
  9. Draw the dot to the left.
  10. Draw the hook at the center. This is almost like a horizontal line with a small sweeping dot.
  11. Draw the sweeping stroke.
  12. Draw the hook. The sweeping stroke is parallel to the previous stroke.
  13. Draw the dot between the sweeping strokes.
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