To Found

July 20, 2010

"To Found" in kanji. Japanese calligraphy art by Nao.

"To Found" by Nao

mō-keru, setsu

The meaning of this character is close to the verb “found.” Although it implies “to make something,” it is often used when something big is set up or founded.

The verb “mōkeru” means to set up something such as facilities. It also means holding a party.

Sekkei is a plan or a design and its verb “sekkei suru means “to plan” or “to design.” Setsuritsu means establishment or established and its verb “setsuritsu suru means “to establish.”

Adding something like facilities to the exiting ones is zōsetsu, of which the means increasing. You can use this word when you increase your computer’s memory. Its verb is “zōsetsu suru.”


The kanji for "to Found" with the stroke order and arrows showing directions.

  1. Draw the dot on the top.
  2. Draw the horizontal stroke.
  3. Draw the horizontal stroke below the previous stroke.
  4. Draw the horizontal stroke above the rectangle.
  5. Draw the left side of rectangle.
  6. Draw the upper and right sides of the rectangle.
  7. Draw the lower side of the rectangle.
  8. Begin to draw the right-hand side of the character. Draw the sweeping stroke.
  9. Draw the crooked stroke with an upward turn.
  10. Draw the hook. The latter part is a sweeping stroke.
  11. Draw the sweeping stroke crossing the previous stroke.

The Sea

July 19, 2010

"The Sea" in kanji. Japanese calligraphy art by Nao.

"The Sea" by Nao

umi, kai

A Happy Marine Day! It’s “umi no hi in Japanese.

We are having a long weekend in Japan now. Today is a happy Monday and Marine Day. This holiday is not traditional and there is nothing to celebrate as far as I know. When the government first made this holiday, it set Marine Day on July 20. Some years ago, it became a Happy Monday. A Monday close to July 20 became Marine Day.

Let me introduce some words relating to the sea. Seaweed is kai. Seawater is kaisui. Seabirds are umidori. A sea breeze is umikaze.


The kanji for "the Sea" with the stroke order and arrows showing directions.

  1. Draw the dot in the upper-left corner of the character.
  2. Draw the dot below it.
  3. Draw the upward stroke in the lower-left corner. This stroke is heading toward the next stroke.
  4. Draw the sweeping stroke from the top.
  5. Draw the horizontal stroke touching the previous stroke.
  6. Draw the rotated chevron shape.
  7. Draw the hook, making a box. Turn upward at the end.
  8. Draw the sweeping stroke in the box.
  9. Draw the long horizontal line.

A Good Job

July 18, 2010

"A Good Job" in kanji. Japanese calligraphy art by Nao.

"A Good Job" by Nao

kō, ku

This character mainly means “a good job.”

We use the word “kō” in idiomatic expressions. Verbs that follow this word are rather formal and not used in daily conversations. For example, “kō wo togeru” means to accomplish a reputable thing. The verb togeru means “to accomplish.” It sounds classical.

One of the most popular words including this character is “seikō” meaning success. The verb seikōsuru means “to succeed.” The sei of seikō means “to become” or “to achieve.”

Here are some other examples:

  • myō … fame
  • nen … seniority
  • ri teki na … utilitarian (Utilitarianism is kōrishugi. Shugi is the suffix “–ism.”)

The kanji for "A Good Job" with the stroke order and arrows showing directions.

  1. Draw the horizontal stroke.
  2. Draw the vertical stroke.
  3. Draw the quasi-horizontal stroke. Sweep the stroke toward the beginning of the next stroke.
  4. Begin to draw the right-hand side of the character. Draw the hook with an upward turn.
  5. Draw the sweeping stroke from the top.

Blessing (Sosho)

July 17, 2010

"Blessing (Sosho)" in kanji. Japanese calligraphy art by Nao.

"Blessing (Sosho)" by Nao

megumi, megu-mu, kei, e

Today’s character is also written in sho style. The basic information about this character and its kaisho style is -> here.

The style, sho, is more cursive than gyō sho style. Its gyōsho style is -> here.

The kanji for "Blessing (Sosho)" with arrows showing directions.

To Explain (Sosho)

July 16, 2010

"To Explain (Sosho)" in kanji. Japanese calligraphy art by Nao.

"To Explain (Sosho)" by Nao

to-ku, setsu

This character is written in sho style. The basic information about this character and its kaisho style is -> here.

The kanji for "To Explain (Sosho)" with arrows showing directions.

"A Person" in kanji. Japanese calligraphy art by Nao.

"A Person" by Nao

mono, sha

Although this character means a person, we rarely use it as an independent word. It always follows some modifiers. It is equivalent to the suffix –er added to verbs to form nouns which refer to a person.

-mono

  • A careless and hasty person is awatemono. Awate comes from the verb “awateru,” meaning “to be hasty.”
  • A thoughtless, careless, and absentminded person is ukkarimono. Ukkari means carelessness.
  • A big figure or a VIP is ōmono.
  • A popular person is nin kimono.” Ninki means popularity.
  • A fool is orokamono or bakamono. Both oroka and baka means fool.
  • A lazy person is namakemono. Nameke comes from the verb “namakeru,” meaning “to laze.”
  • A sharp and clever person is kiremono. Kire comes from the verb “kireru,” meaning “to cut.”
  • A young person is wakamono.
  • A coward is shō shinmono.” Shōshin means cowardice.

-sha

  • Others are tasha.
  • The strong are kyōsha.
  • The weak are jakusha. Jaku means weak.
  • A reporter is kisha.
  • A scholar is gakusha.

The kanji for "A Person" with the stroke order and arrows showing directions.

  1. Draw the horizontal stroke on the top.
  2. Draw the vertical stroke crossing the previous stroke.
  3. Draw the longest horizontal stroke.
  4. Draw the sweeping stroke from the upper right corner of the character.
  5. Draw the left side of the rectangle.
  6. Draw the upper and right sides of the rectangle.
  7. Draw the horizontal stroke in the rectangle.
  8. Draw the horizontal stroke at the bottom.

To Explain

July 14, 2010

"To Explain" in kanji. Japanese calligraphy art by Nao.

"To Explain" by Nao

to-ku, setsu

The verb “toku” is a written expression meaning to explain, to persuade, or to preach.

Since there is another verb “toku” with another character meaning “to solve,” the word “toku” can be ambiguous. When you want to mean “to explain” explicitly, use the verb “setsumei suru.”

Similarly, to persuade is “settokusuru,” and to preach is “sekkyōsuru.” In the former word, “settoku” is the combination of today’s character and toku, meaning to obtain; in the latter word, “sekkyō” is the combination of today’s character and kyō, meaning to teach.

A legend is densetsu. The adjectival word densetsutekina means legendary. It accompanies a noun.

A novel is shōsetsu. You can read or write shōsetsu, so it becomes the object of verbs yomu (to read) and kaku (to write).


Draw the left-hand side of the character, first.

The kanji for "To Explain" with the stroke order and arrows showing directions.

  1. Draw the dot on the top.
  2. Draw the horizontal stroke.
  3. Draw the horizontal stroke below the previous stroke.
  4. Draw the horizontal stroke above the rectangle.
  5. Draw the left side of rectangle.
  6. Draw the upper and right sides of the rectangle.
  7. Draw the lower side of the rectangle.
  8. Begin to draw the right-hand side. Draw the dot on the top.
  9. Draw the sweeping dot.
  10. Draw the left side of the rectangle.
  11. Draw the upper and right sides of the rectangle.
  12. Draw the lower side of the rectangle.
  13. Draw the sweeping stroke.
  14. Draw the curve with an upward turn.
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