Please visit http://www.japanesecalligrapher.com/bjc/
for more characters.

We’re Leaving Here to …

February 2, 2011

“To Leave” in kanji. Japanese calligraphy art by Nao.

saru, kyo, ko

Today, we have an important ANNOUNCEMENT. We are leaving here to a new website. Nao and I have been talking about having a new website with an original domain. Although it seems to be a lot of work to move this completely considering all the links set here, we decided to start to post without relocating links embedded in each page. So if you click links in the new blog, you are likely to come back somewhere in this blog. We will fix the problem bit by bit.

Our new blog is at http://www.japanesecalligrapher.com/bjc/

The verb saru means “to leave.” For further information about this character, go to >>> this page of our new blog.

To Buy

February 1, 2011

“To Buy” in kanji. Japanese calligraphy art by Nao.

To Buy

ka-u, bai

Generally, buying something or shopping is expressed as “ka i mono.” The verb kau means to buy. The past tense of kau is katta or kaimashita. The former is written; the latter is polite.

Fubai un is boycott.


The kanji for “To Buy” with the stroke order and arrows showing directions.

  1. Begin to draw the smaller rectangle on the top. Draw the left side of the rectangle.
  2. Draw the upper and right sides of the rectangle.
  3. Draw the left vertical stroke in the rectangle.
  4. Draw the right vertical stroke in the rectangle.
  5. Draw the lower side of the rectangle.
  6. Begin to draw the larger rectangle. Draw the vertical line to the left.
  7. Draw the upper and right sides of the rectangle.
  8. Draw the upper horizontal stroke in the rectangle.
  9. Draw the lower horizontal stroke in the rectangle.
  10. Draw the lower side of the rectangle.
  11. Draw the sweeping stroke.
  12. Draw the dot in the lower right corner of the character.

Technique

January 31, 2011

“Technique” in kanji. Japanese calligraphy art by Nao.

Technique

waza, gi

Waza is a technique. Gijutsu is technique. Kowaza means a useful method. Some jobs or tasks done quickly are hayawaza.

Gi means skill or technical skill. Gi means technical methods.


The kanji for “Technique” with the stroke order and arrows showing directions.

  1. Draw the left-hand side of the character first. Draw the short horizontal stroke.
  2. Draw the vertical stroke with an upward turn.
  3. Draw the sweeping stroke heading rightward.
  4. Begin to draw the right-hand side. Draw the horizontal stroke on the top.
  5. Draw the vertical stroke crossing the previous stroke.
  6. Draw the hook consisting of a horizontal stroke and a sweeping one.
  7. Draw the sweeping stroke crossing the previous stroke.

Samurai

January 30, 2011

“Samurai” in kanji. Japanese calligraphy art by Nao.

Samurai

shi

This character originally depicts a strong man. When I use “originally” like this, it always means when it came from China because kanji was brought from China to Japan. For some characters, we have Japanese original meanings. In Japanese, today’s character means samurai (a warrior) which is Japanese original. And it also means a talented person as in Chinese.

In the Edo era (1603-1867), Japan was a feudal society, in which people were divided into social classes called “shi nō shō.” The highest class was shi, that is, samurai.  The second class was farmers; the third, artisans; and the lowest, merchants. It did not indicate how wealthy people were. Most merchants were richer than farmers or artisans. This class system reflects Confucius ideas. People working for money were disdained. Practically, samurai was the ruling class and the other classed were the ruled.

We still use this character for some professions and degrees. Bachelors of Art is gakushi. Master of Art is shūshi. A doctor is hakase. A lawyer is bengoshi. A sumo wrestler is rikishi.

In other words, this character is used to express somebody’s title.

You cannot find some of the above characters in our archives. If you want to see them in Japanese, visit >>> here.

The kanji for “Samurai” with the stroke order and arrows showing directions.

The upper horizontal stroke is longer than the lower one. Notice the difference between this character and tsuchi (soil).

Soil by Nao

Bridge

January 29, 2011

“Bridge” in kanji. Japanese calligraphy art by Nao.

Bridge

hashi (bashi), kyō

We call a bridge “hashi.” The names of bridges end with “bashi,” a voiced sound of hashi. In the neighbor of Tokyo station alone, there are some places called “… bashi.” For example, Nihonbashi, Kyōbashi, and Shinbashi. These names suggest that there used to be bridges in ancient times. The bridge called Nihonbashi still exists but it is an artifact classified as Important Cultural Properties.


The kanji for “Bridge” with the stroke order and arrows showing directions.

  1. First, draw the left-hand side of the character. Draw the horizontal stroke.
  2. Draw the vertical stroke.
  3. Draw the sweeping stroke from where the previous strokes cross.
  4. Draw the dot hanging from the vertical stroke.
  5. Begin to draw the right-hand side of the character. Draw the sweeping stroke on the top.
  6. Draw the horizontal stroke.
  7. Draw the sweeping stroke crossing the previous stroke.
  8. Draw the other sweeping stroke.
  9. Draw the left side of the upper rectangle.
  10. Draw the upper and right sides of the rectangle.
  11. Draw the lower side of the rectangle.
  12. Draw the vertical stroke from near the center to the bottom.
  13. Draw the hook with an upward turn.
  14. Draw the left side of the lower rectangle.
  15. Draw the upper and right sides of the rectangle.
  16. Draw the lower side of the rectangle.

To Fly

January 28, 2011

Please click -> here to find information on this character and visit http://www.japanesecalligrapher.com
for more characters.

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